Summer 2010 Intern Project- Garrett Brinkley

PH 9.5 AFFECT ON BACTERIOPHAGE BINDING TO ZNO TO ULTIMATELY CREATE ORDERED MESOPOROUS ZNO

Garrett Brinkley
Biochemistry
UC Santa Barbara    

Mentor: Kristen Murphy
Faculty Advisor: Galen Stucky
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry

As the need for energy increases, so does the need for a material with increased energy efficiency.  One method that can accomplish this is the formation of a mesoporous ZnO crystal which can be used in a thin cell photovoltaic to increase its efficiency of converting photons to electrical current.  Through the process of biomineralization, nature is capable of forming complex and intricate inorganic structures using proteins to control the mineralization.  Utilizing this idea we use a bacteriophage library to bind a diverse group of proteins to ZnO, allowing for the selection of high affinity peptides.   Using harsh conditions and lots of washing less strongly bound phage are removed and stronger phage remain bound to the ZnO.  Because nano ZnO wires are grown in a pH of 9.5, we attempt to understand the difference in the bound phage at a pH of 9.5 compared with pH  7.5.  Current data has shown a difference in binding sequences. The difference in binding maybe due to the electrostatic interactions between amines and the ZnO at a pH of 7.5 and a less favorable interaction at a higher pH.  By better understanding the binding of peptides to ZnO, we can improve control in the synthesis of mesoporous ZnO using the peptides as a template directing molecules.

View Poster

contact ceem